May 18, 2015

How the Affordable Care Act Is Like Prohibition

Adam C. Smith

Assistant Professor of Economics, Johnson and Wales University
Summary

The Affordable Care Act is now in its fifth year. Many things have changed since March 23, 2010 when it was passed into law. Website rollouts, cost curves and enrollment figures have dominated the new stories. What we speak so little of, however, is how health care has actually been reformed and how this in turn defined what health care reform means to us today.

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The Affordable Care Act is now in its fifth year. Many things have changed since March 23, 2010 when it was passed into law. Website rollouts, cost curves and enrollment figures have dominated the new stories. What we speak so little of, however, is how health care has actually been reformed and how this in turn defined what health care reform means to us today.

To do this, we would need to examine the groups responsible for what ultimately became the bill passed into law, which can help us make sense of what we consider health care reform today. Health care reform is the product of "bootlegger" and "baptist" interests coming together to restructure the industry in their favor, all brought together by a "televangelist" administration.

So what in the world does all that mean?

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