August 1, 2015

Two Burritos for Breakfast

Veronique de Rugy

George Gibbs Chair in Political Economy
Summary

McDonald's started posting calorie counts on all its menus in September 2012. The move was partially a response to a proposed 2011 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule affecting chain restaurants and large vending machine operators. Under the rule, calories must be displayed on all menus and menu boards, while other nutritional information—including calories from fat, cholesterol, sugars, and protein—must be made available in writing upon request.

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This article appears in the August/September edition of Reason Magazine

On my way into work, I usually hit the McDonald's drive-through for breakfast. My typical order: two sausage burritos and a large Diet Coke (no ice). The menu board informs me that each burrito contains 300 calories. That's 50 more than an egg white sandwich but 300 fewer than a bacon, egg, and cheese bagel.

McDonald's started posting calorie counts on all its menus in September 2012. The move was partially a response to a proposed 2011 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule affecting chain restaurants and large vending machine operators. Under the rule, calories must be displayed on all menus and menu boards, while other nutritional information—including calories from fat, cholesterol, sugars, and protein—must be made available in writing upon request.

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