December 23, 2013

The One Thing Both Parties Agree On: More Spending

Veronique de Rugy

Senior Research Fellow
Summary

On Dec. 10, Senate Budget Committee chairwoman Patty Murray and House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan unveiled the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. Coming after partisan gridlock and political incentives prevented Congress from enacting a constitutionally required budget for almost half a decade, the Ryan-Murray plan was sold as a great budget compromise.

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On Dec. 10, Senate Budget Committee chairwoman Patty Murray and House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan unveiled the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. Coming after partisan gridlock and political incentives prevented Congress from enacting a constitutionally required budget for almost half a decade, the Ryan-Murray plan was sold as a great budget compromise.

It is not. A budget compromise would mean Democrats agreeing to reform entitlements while Republicans would be willing to stick to defense budget cuts. Instead, the deal is more of the same: more spending today in exchange for spending cuts tomorrow.

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